Explosion Testing for dust, gases & vapours
© EHTL June 2015

DSEAR and ATEX

DSEAR implements the requirements of ATEX

137 (Directive 99/92/EC ) in the UK

Explosive atmospheres can be caused by combustible dusts mixed with air and are designated zone 20, zone 21 or zone 22 depending upon the frequency and duration of the dust cloud. If an effective source of ignition comes into contact with the explosive atmosphere, a dust explosion will result. This free 16 page guide describes the standard laboratory tests available to characterise dusts for their ignition and explosion hazard properties. It describes the tests and the parameters they measure, enabling plant engineers and system designers to make informed judgement on safety matters such as: what is safety critical information and what is simply ‘interesting to know’; whether explosion and ignition information can be reliably taken from published data; is data required for every dust and powder being handled, or can ‘worst case’ materials be identified?
Dust testing for DSEAR & ATEX compliance
Fires and explosions under DSEAR and ATEX
Explosion Testing
© EHTL June 2015

DSEAR and ATEX

DSEAR implements the

requirements of ATEX 137

(Directive 99/92/EC ) in the

UK

Explosive atmospheres can be caused by combustible dusts mixed with air and are designated zone 20, zone 21 or zone 22 depending upon the frequency and duration of the dust cloud. If an effective source of ignition comes into contact with the explosive atmosphere, a dust explosion will result. This free 16 page guide describes the standard laboratory tests available to characterise dusts for their ignition and explosion hazard properties. It describes the tests and the parameters they measure, enabling plant engineers and system designers to make informed judgement on safety matters such as: what is safety critical information and what is simply ‘interesting to know’; whether explosion and ignition information can be reliably taken from published data; is data required for every dust and powder being handled, or can ‘worst case’ materials be identified?